Muscle Tears and Strains Pain Recovery in Minneapolis-St. Paul

When a muscle is torn, often it is not completely torn. People are frequently told that they have a partial tear and must undergo physical therapy because they are not surgical candidates. These are excellent candidates for Evo Performance Rehab's neurological soft tissue therapy because the body's immediate response to a tear is creating a guarded shut-down pattern.

If a person tears their hamstring partially, they are often extremely tight, and their body is not allowing them to walk normally or bend normally. This isn't always necessary and could be seen as a protective overreaction to a small tear.

Our job at Evo Performance Rehab with this type of situation is to ensure that all of the muscles in the limb or in the surrounding areas are each doing their own work. The tear typically occurs when one area is forced to overwork and do a job it was not designed to do, or to bear more load than it was designed to bear.

Back to Water Skiing After Torn Hamstring

We had an example of a gentleman who partially tore his hamstring while water skiing, when we did our neurological search. His hamstring was not the chief dysfunction. It was his adductor muscles next to his hamstring.

When we did a reeducation protocol on the adductors, instead of him barely being able to reach his kneecaps in a forward bend, he was able to pull himself off the floor with minimal pain, even though he still had a partially torn hamstring.

By getting the adductors to talk to each other properly, his hamstring could now relax and heal faster. Essentially, the hamstring was overworked for what the adductors were not doing.

Bodybuilder Recovers From Pec Muscle Tear In Six Weeks

A competitive bodybuilder we worked with had a pec muscle tear from bench pressing, which is another way to quickly speed up the healing process after a tear.

It was told to him by his surgeon that he should expect to regain about five degrees of range of motion per week and that he should not lift any weights until six months or more after surgery. This was absolutely crushing to him because lifting weights was a huge part of his identity and his life's passion.

When we did our evaluation, we found that the dysfunction was in his rotator cuff and the inner head of his tricep rather than in the PEC muscle itself. So, when we got the rotator cuff and the tricep to talk to each other properly, the PEC was able to lengthen and loosen on its own. This gave him full range of motion again in just four days, without forcing any movement or putting stress on any tissues.

He was then able to progress into other phases of rehab. And essentially, he was able to do pushups without any pain six weeks after surgery. Within eight and a half weeks of surgery, he could bench press 245 pounds. At the same time, he gained a full inch in circumference on his surgical arm and around three inches of circumference around his chest between when we took our first measurement in session three, and when he completed his planned sessions at session 20.

So essentially, he went from hating life and being in a sling at three and a half weeks post surgery to being extremely functional and confident enough to regain all of his activities within the span of about five and a half weeks.

Our Process

Become pain-free In 3 Steps

Connect

One of our rehab specialists will be happy to talk with you during a free consultation call to learn more about your problem and determine whether we can probably help.

Evaluate

If you live in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area, you can visit any of our facilities and work with a Neuro-Therapy practitioner to complete an evaluation treatment.

Engage

Experience a personalized treatment plan that uses movement and specific neurological stimulation to retrain your nervous system to work in "inhibited" areas.

Success Stories

Faster, lasting results than traditional treatments

Adam Bisek, Bodybuilder - Pec Tear Rehab

Adam Bisek, a bodybuilding physique competitor and personal trainer came to Evo Performance Rehab after he had his pec torn and surgically reattached. Adam went through our Neuro-Therapy process and drastically accelerated his recovery.

Normal time to being able to do pushups post surgery: 6 months
Adam's time: 6 weeks

Normal rate of regaining range of motion: 5 degrees per week
Adam's Rate: Full range of motion within 3 treatments.

Zavier Steward, Running Back - Ankle Rehab

Zavier is a talented Running Back, but recently had a knee surgery and a major ankle surgery. Zavier came to Evo Performance Rehab and is now far surpassed what he thought 100% would be for him and the function of his ankle.

Dominic is an excellent Neuro-Therapy Coach for anyone in pain or dealing with an injury. His strengths include being deliberate in his approach, focused on restorative techniques, and in complete command of the therapy process. He places great significance on helping his clients feel better and regain their strength, and he does so with a strong belief in the power of the mind and body to heal. Overall, Dominic is a highly skilled and knowledgeable coach who can help his clients achieve their goals efficiently and effectively. If you're looking for a coach who can help you restore your physical and mental health, Dominic is an excellent choice. 👍

Troy Thompson
Troy Thompson
March 8, 2023

Dominic was fantastic! He helped me solve a nagging problem with my knee which then allowed me to complete a challenging hike in Switzerland we had been planning for years! If you have a physical issue, I highly recommend EVO!!

Mark Sievers
Mark Sievers
March 8, 2023

Dominic does great work!

Jake Johnson
Jake Johnson
February 22, 2023

Recover with EVO

Each Neuro-Therapy process begins with a free phone consultation, followed by an in-clinic or virtual evaluation treatment session.

We walk you through the Neuro-Therapy process so you can see the significant differences that even one session can make.

This helps us find the best treatment plan for your lasting success.

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